Black History Month 2019

Sidney Poitier
Black History Heroes | Sidney Poitier
Posted on 02/15/2019
Award winning actor, director, and author, Sidney Poitier broke racial barriers and stereotyping in the film industry to become the leading African American male actor of the 20th Century.  In a career that spanned 57 years, Poitier was a featured performer or starred in 48 films and directed six.
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Condoleezza Rice
Black History Heroes | Condoleezza Rice
Posted on 02/14/2019
Dr. Condoleezza Rice is the first black woman to serve as the United States’ national security adviser, as well as the first black woman to serve as U.S. Secretary of State (2005-09). Condoleezza Rice was born in 1954 in Alabama. She became the first woman and first African American to serve as provost of Stanford University. In 2001, Rice was appointed national security adviser by President George W. Bush, becoming the first black woman (and second woman) to hold the post, and went on to become the first black woman to serve as U.S. Secretary of State.
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Muhammad Ali
Black History Heroes | Muhammad Ali
Posted on 02/13/2019
Muhammad Ali, arguably the most famous professional boxer in the 20th Century and the only fighter to win the heavyweight championship three times, was born Cassius Clay in 1942 in Louisville, Kentucky, to Cassius Marcellus Clay, Sr. and Odessa Grady Clay.  At the age of 12 Clay began training as a boxer.  
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Usian Bolt
Black History Heroes | Usian Bolt
Posted on 02/12/2019
Usain Bolt will no longer be electrifying crowds with his speed on the track any longer, but the impact of the Jamaican speedster will undoubtedly live on. Bolt celebrated his 31st birthday as a highly decorated, record-setting sprinter. Usain St. Leo Bolt was born in Sherwood Content in the Trealawny Parish of Jamaica. As a boy, Bolt played cricket and soccer and was a standout in each sport. Coaches noticed his speed on the field and suggested sprinting, which led to the tutelage of former Olympic sprinter Pablction to McNeil and his conneo coach Glen Mills.
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Tyrone Keith McGriff Sr.
Local Black History Hero | Tyrone Keith McGriff Sr.
Posted on 02/11/2019
A native of Gifford, Fla., was born on January 13, 1958, to Harry and Dollie McGriff. Tyrone graduated in 1976 from Vero Beach Senior High School. He played on varsity Football team being select as an All-state and All-area player.
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Black History Heroes | Martin Luther King Jr.
Black History Heroes | Martin Luther King Jr.
Posted on 02/10/2019
One of the most visible advocates of nonviolence and direct action as methods of social change, Martin Luther King, Jr. was born in Atlanta, Georgia on January 15, 1929. As the grandson of the Rev. A.D. Williams, pastor of Ebenezer Baptist church and a founder of Atlanta’s NAACP chapter, and the son of Martin Luther King, Sr., who succeeded Williams as Ebenezer’s pastor, King’s roots were in the African American Baptist church.
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Black History Heroes | Serena Williams
Black History Heroes | Serena Williams
Posted on 02/09/2019
Eight-time world No. 1-ranked professional tennis player Serena Williams was born September 26, 1981 in Saginaw, Michigan. She holds 23 Grand Slam singles titles, 12 in women’s doubles, and two in mixed doubles for 39 total—the most of any active player. Formerly coached by parents Richard Williams and Oracene Price, Williams is the younger sister and frequent doubles partner of former world No. 1 professional tennis player Venus Williams.
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Black History Heroes | Arturo Alfonso Schomburg
Black History Heroes | Arturo Alfonso Schomburg
Posted on 02/08/2019
Arturo Alfonso Schomburg was born in the town of Santurce, Puerto Rico (now part of San Juan), to María Josefa, a freeborn black midwife from St. Croix, and Carlos Federico Schomburg, a German merchant living in Puerto Rico. While Schomburg was in grade school, one of his teachers claimed that blacks had no history, heroes or accomplishments. Inspired to prove the teacher wrong, Schomburg determined that he would find and document the accomplishments of Africans on their own continent and in the diaspora.
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Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander
Black History Heroes | Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander
Posted on 02/07/2019
Born two decades before American women won the right to vote, Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander overcame obstacles as a female and also as an African American in the elite profession of law. In 1927 she became the first black woman to gain admission to the Pennsylvania Bar, beginning a long career advocating for civil and human rights.
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Black History Heroes | Robert Smalls
Black History Heroes | Robert Smalls
Posted on 02/06/2019
Robert Smalls was an enslaved African American who escaped to freedom in a Confederate supply ship and eventually became a sea captain for the Union Navy. After the war, he became a successful businessman and politician serving in both houses of the South Carolina legislature. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1875 but was convicted of taking a bribe while in the state senate and sentenced to prison before he was pardoned by the governor.
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Black History Heroes | W.E.B. Du Bois
Black History Heroes | W.E.B. Du Bois
Posted on 02/05/2019
W.E.B. Du Bois was one of the most important African-American activists during the first half of the 20th century. He co-founded the NAACP and supported Pan-Africanism. Scholar and activist W.E.B. Du Bois was born on February 23, 1868, in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. In 1895, he became the first African American to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard University. Civil Rights Activist, Educator, Journalist (1868–1963) ~
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Black History Heroes | Carter G. Woodson
Black History Heroes | Carter G. Woodson
Posted on 02/04/2019
Carter G. Woodson was an African-American writer and historian known as the 'Father of Black History.' He penned the influential book 'The Mis-Education of the Negro.' Born in 1875 in New Canton, Virginia, Carter G. Woodson was the second African American to receive a doctorate from Harvard, after W.E.B. Du Bois. Known as the "Father of Black History," Woodson dedicated his career to the field of African-American history and lobbied extensively to establish Black History Month as a nationwide institution.
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